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3D Printing Tradeoffs and Optimization

Written by Max Murphy. Posted in 3D Model

There are four areas where tradeoffs are commonly made in 3D printing:

  • conventional and additive manufacturing processes
  • additive manufacturing processes
  • 3D printer selection
  • different parameter settings in a 3D printer’s build process

The most common design goals considered for 3D printing tradeoffs are strength, speed of printing, minimum feature resolution, and cost.  The same 3D model can be manufactured using different processes and parameter settings to optimize one or more these aspects of the finished design. Making the right 3D printing tradeoffs for optimum results requires an understanding of design principles and the possibilities inherent in the process.

3d Printing IP Issues

Written by Max Murphy. Posted in 3D Model, Legal Issues, Rules of Thumb

One good way to make predictions about the future of a new technology is to examine the paths that similar technologies have taken historically and use them to draw likely trajectories. As Mark Twain observed, “History may not repeat itself but it does rhyme.” New technologies solve existing problems in in new ways, obsoleting existing solutions for the same needs. Despite some of the sensationalism a closer examination of intellectual property challenges faced by earlier technologies shows that they rhyme with 3D printing IP issues. These challenges offer a roadmap for the likely evolution of 3D printing–and related technologies like 3D scanning and 3D modeling.

3D printer combinations

Written by Max Murphy. Posted in 3D Model

3D printing’s first impact was in the prototype sector of the manufacturing process. 3D printing will not replace traditional (“subtractive”) manufacturing methods, but rather 3D printing technology will be combined with pre-existing machines.  There are currently five machines that are most likely going to be the future of 3D printer combinations.

3D Printing: The Next Best Thing But Not Yet

Written by Max Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, Customer Development

3D printing is overhyped and its implications are not well understood. It will be twenty plus years before there is a 3D printer in most homes due to limitations of the cost of the machine, material, obtaining software and learning how to use the software. Other fundamentally problem that prevent 3D printers being adapted by the public are to understanding of design, physics, and material science and a change of behavior of making things at home.

Chris Yonge on 3D Printing: Past, Present, Future

Written by Max Murphy. Posted in Events, Video

The following is a guest post by Max Murphy, a mechanical engineering student who is interested in the implications of  3D printing or positive manufacturing for  mechanical design, its synergies with animation, and potential for fostering new opportunities for entrepreneurs. Max is an intern at DreamWorks and returns to his sophomore year in college this fall. 


3D Printing: Past, Present, and Future

I attended a great talk by Chris Yonge on “3D Printing: Past, Present, and Future” on Monday August 18 at Sandbox Suites in Sunnyvale that was sponsored by the Silicon Valley Startup: Idea to IPO group. It was a fantastic presentation that communicated a practical understanding of several different types of 3D printing processes with videos that highlighted the theory of operation for each type of printer. Chris also offered a list of useful open source tools for mechanical design, animation, and 3D printing that is available at  http://www.studiocruz.com/downloads/studio-cruz-open-source-guide-20130115.pdf

Here is Chris’ bio from the talk (links added):

Chris Yonge is qualified as an architect and a product designer who founded StudioCruz.  He has been involved in 3D design and production for twenty years. He holds a number of published patents, the latest being for VariCruz a mechanically-linked continuously variable gear, and uses 3D printing in metal and plastics as part of the development process. Chris is a lecturer at the University of California, Santa Cruz School of Engineering.

Unfortunately a recording was not made of the talk but here are two others he has done that are quite good.

3D Printing Is Fostering Four Quiet Revolutions

Yonge outlines “four quiet revolutions” that 3D printing or positive manufacturing will likely bring about:

  1. How we make:  Machine shop equipment was traditionally subtractive: grinding, cutting, drilling based on linear or rotary motion.
  2. How we design:  Three-dimensional printing is enabling us to go from a three-dimensional model in my mind to recording it and communicating and editing it on a computer and then making it.
  3. How we communicate:  One of the oldest cave drawings known condenses three dimensions plus time (and related emotions) into a flat two dimensional drawing. Our ability to communicate was unchanged for 149 centuries until motion pictures added time, 3D computer models allowed for a third dimension, and now we can make what we visualize with 3D printing.
  4. How we finance:  Open source recipes are going unlock a tremendous amount of creativity. Kickstarter models will enable many new products and companies to be launched via crowdsourcing.

Animation & 3D Printing Add New Dimensions to Creativity

A video with synchronized slides of one his Santa Cruz Engineering lectures is available at
https://slideslive.com/38891762/computer-animation-and-3d-printing-new-dimensions-to-creativity

Chris Yonge has a YouTube Channel with more than 50 videos at https://www.youtube.com/user/chrisyonge/videos

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