Discovery Kanban Helps You Manage Risks and Options In Your Product Roadmap

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Customer Development, Lean Startup, skmurphy, Tools for Startups

I came across this presentation from LLKD13 (#LLKD13  / storify) by Patrick Steyaert (@PatrickSteyaert) of Okaloa on Discovery Kanban after following some links off a Kanban discussion group last year:

Slides

Video

It’s a complex and challenging presentation that connects a number of different concepts–including fitness landscape models, the Cynefin framework  and its concept of probes, the OODA loop, optionality–into a coherent synthesis: Kanban models can be used not only for managing execution or delivery flow by minimizing the amount of work in progress, but also for managing the discovery process of curating a portfolio of risks and options.

At a high level an execution focus yields a prioritized network of interdependent tasks; exploration yields a portfolio of risks and options.

I had the good fortune to meet Arlette Vercammen of Okaloa a the Lean Startup Conference 2013 and we had a conversation that has sparked an ongoing collaboration around helping Okaloa evolve their Discovery Kanban model both for startups and change agents in larger firms.

Patrick will be providing an updated version of the presentation June 16 in Leuven, Belgium:  ”More Agility and Predictability with Visual Management and Kanban.”

Related blog posts and articles

Video from Lean Innovation 101 Talk at SF Bay ACM Nov-20-2013

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, 4 Finding your Niche, Events, Lean Startup, skmurphy, Video

The video from my “What is Lean–Lean Innovation 101” talk is up:

Here is the description for the talk

“Lean” provides a scientific approach for creating a product and developing new businesses. Teams can iteratively building products or services to meet the needs of early customers by adopting a combination of customer development, business-hypothesis-driven experimentation and iterative product releases. This talk covers:

  • Why more and more companies are using Lean
  • What is Lean, what it is not
  • Key concepts
  • Get Out Of Your BatCave
  • Use an initial product (MVP) as a probe to explore the market
  • Build-Measure-Learn
  • When and how to pivot
  • Rules of thumb for successful lean innovation

I want to thank Alex Sokolsky for his outstanding effort on behalf of SF Bay ACM doing the video capture and editing.

MVP: What’s Really Under Your Control

Written by Theresa Shafer. Posted in 3 Early Customer Stage, Community of Practice, Customer Development, Lean Startup, Workshop

An MVP is an offering for sale

We use this definition in our “Engineering Your Sales” and “Validating Your MVP” workshops and our MVP clinics. Our focus is on developing and selling products to businesses so that biases the definition a little bit but it’s important to remember what’s under your control in crafting your MVP:

  1. The particular type of customer: you can select who are you targeting and messaging. In many B2B markets the best message is a dog whistle: highly appealing to your target and of little interest to those who are not.
  2. The specific problem or need your focus on: it’s better to pick a very narrow pain point initially so that you maximize your chances of providing value.
  3. What you provide: the feature set and packaging of your offering.

These are normally the three areas that you tinker with during marketing exploration and MVP introduction. It’s also important to understand what’s not under your control: 

  1. The customer decides if the need is important enough, or the problem severe enough, to devote any time to conversation or learning more about your offering.
  2. The customer decides if your solution offers enough of a difference over the status quo and other alternatives available to them to actively consider. Value is in the customer’s mind and it’s created in the customer’s business when they successfully deploy your offering. Your MVP is not valuable in the abstract; it must always be evaluated in the context of a particular customer. It does not matter how much time and expense you have invested in creating it, it’s the effect it will have on the customer’s business.
  3. The customer decides the nature and size of the initial purchase. You can decide not to pursue an opportunity that is “too small” but if the customer wants to pilot in a team or one department before deploying your solution more widely it’s often better to take that deal and get started than continue to argue for a larger initial deal. Breaking your offering into phases and smaller components will always make it easier to digest.

The following chalk talk illustrates this last point in more detail:

See “Chalk Talk on Technology Adoption” for a transcript.

MVP: Are You Building a Death Star?

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, Customer Development, Lean Startup, skmurphy

“Empires build Death Stars, rebels build X-Wing fighters.”


Update 22-July 2013

Here are some other good MVP blog posts

Here is a link to the Lego Death Star and the description I used.

Validating Your MVP For B2B Startups at SF Lean Startup Circle Tue-Jun-4

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 3 Early Customer Stage, Customer Development, Events, Lean Startup, Workshop

We have been invited back the SF Lean Startup Circle to present our “Validating Your MVP and Value Proposition for B2B Startups” workshop on June 4, starting 5:30pm. This interactive workshop will address:

  1. How a B2B startup should think about  message, MVP, and launch.
  2. Understand who buys your product and how they calculate its value and total cost.
  3. Where to find people to validate your MVP.
  4. Systematic approach to validating your MVP and your value proposition.
  5. How to track and measure your efforts.
  6. When to pivot.

When: June 4, 5:30-8:30
Where: Runway, 1355 Market Street, Suite 488, San Francisco, CA
Cost: $60 (or join the volunteer mailing list to get in free.)
Register:  Meetup.com/Lean-Startup-Circle/events/115783162/


Tristan Kromer‘s (@TriKro) vision for the SF Lean Startup Circle is  to offer a testbed for developing workshops for entrepreneurs. So with this iteration we are adding a new module where participants will build a LEGO representation of their business. We believe that this will offer a useful metaphor for analyzing a customer’s business and the value that your MVP offers.

Other LEGO related blog posts:

 

Validating Your MVP & Value Proposition at Lean Startup Circle SF Apr-2

Written by Theresa Shafer. Posted in Events, Lean Startup, Workshop

Join us in San Francisco for an interactive workshop “Validating your MVP & Value Proposition.“  We will cover a variety of proven techniques for validating your MVP & value proposition for B2B startups.

Register NowWhen: 5:30-8:30 PM Tue-Apr-2-2013
Where: 1355 Market, Suite 488, San Francisco
Cost: $60

This interactive workshop will provide:

  1. Systematic approach to validating your MVP & your value proposition
  2. Understand who buys your product and how they calculate its value and total cost
  3. Explore different options for reaching them
  4. Learn how to track efforts and measure results
  5. Determining when to pivot and when to persevere

We will cover:

  • What is MVP?
  • How much do I need to talk to people about my MVP?
  • Techniques for Validation
  • Where to find people to validate Your MVP?
  • Iterating your MVP for problem validation, customer validation, market niche exploration, and product launch

SKMurphy Workshop

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