Five Blogger Outreach Mistakes To Avoid

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Lead Generation, skmurphy, Thought Leadership

I got the following unsolicited E-mail this morning; I think the marketing term for this is “blogger outreach.” I have redacted the name of the sender (“YYY”) and the name of the firm/product (“XXX”) but “[press kit]” and “[review/checkout]” were included verbatim in the original. There was no footer with an unsubscribe option although phone number and address were included after the person’s title.

Good Afternoon,

My name is YYY from XXX. We have developed an online innovation platform that allows businesses to create insight-driven ideation networks.

Each company has their own ideation network allowing them to set ‘challenges’ to their employees, and employees  are able to suggest ideas to solve these challenges.

XXX is exciting and completely different to anything else on the market in that anybody can sign up at XXX and start their innovation network for free within minutes (much like Yammer). All you need to get started is an organisational email address.

I thought you and your readers might be interested in our service. We’re currently in beta at XXX, with currently over 120 companies signed up and using the product since a very soft launch last month. I have a [press kit] I’d like to send your way to [review/checkout] if you’d be interested, and if there’s anything else I can help with let me know!

Thanks,

YYY
Head of Product
<phone number and address>

One Good Thing and Five Mistakes

Good Thing: It’s from a real person with a phone number, physical address and personal email address.

Five mistakes:

  1. Impersonal
  2. No Pricing
  3. No Target Customer
  4. Premature Send
  5. No Unsubscribe

Impersonal

“Good Morning” as an opening is mean to be a catch all. While politer than “To Whom It May Concern” it would be better to format this as an announcement. If you cannot take the time to personalize an email it has substantially less impact, or more accurately less positive impact.

No Price

I wondered how much this would cost. I checked the FAQ where there is a question:

How much does XXX cost?

Full details of our simple pricing structure is available on our pricing page.

But there is no pricing page, which indicates to me they have not worked out their business model. If this were intended to be a freemium app that might be OK, but idea management systems normally capture company proprietary data so it’s unlikely most companies want their internal process improvement ideas or their new product ideas posted on the Internet.

No Target Customer

The FAQ also has this question

Who uses XXX

Organisations of all shapes and sizes from across the globe use XXX. Due to the ease of getting started, organisations with as few as 10 employees are benefitting from using XXX, and thanks to its customisation capabilities, XXXis suitable for large enterprises too.

Based on this FAQ answer it does not appear anyone is actually using your product, or they have not figured out who their target customer is.

Premature Send

This sentence: “I have a [press kit] I’d like to send your way to [review/checkout] if you’d be interested, and if there’s anything else I can help with let me know!” leads me to believe they were not done editing the mass e-mail template before they hit send.

No Unsubscribe Option

This is clearly a mass e-mail without an unsubscribe option, technically it’s “unsolicited commercial e-mail” or “spam.”

Summary

I am not entirely clear on the thought process that leads a startup team to craft this e-mail as an outreach strategy.  Their about page says “After lots of long nights and coffee runs, the first release of XXX was unleashed on our first customers in April 2014.” Unleashed would be a good verb for what happened with this “blogger outreach” campaign.

Thought Leadership: Rotary Club Four Way Test

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Thought Leadership

When I spoke on Thought Leadership at the San Bruno Rotary Club on August 6 this “four way test” was printed on all of the placemats. It was the first time I had encountered it and I found it a useful insight for evaluating a course of action.

Of the things we think, say or do:

  • Is it the TRUTH?
  • Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  • Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  • Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

As I have reflected on the event in the interim I realized that this simple test, developed by Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 to turn around his failing company, was a great example of thought leadership. I had defined thought leadership as the ability to

Discern the important events and trends at work in the present, predict their likely effects, and offer perspective and actionable advice in time to have an impact.

This test offers a way to detect whether an organization or community is healthy. If people are not able to tell the truth, are not fair to other stakeholders, are not promoting goodwill and friendship, and are not seeking out comes that are generally beneficial, then the organization or community will not thrive.

References

Thought Leadership: A Briefing For San Bruno Rotary

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Audio, Events, Silicon Valley, skmurphy, Thought Leadership

I gave a talk on “How to Give a Great Demo” in April at the Co-Founders Club and met Elijah Angote, founder of “The Best Notary” who arranged for me to speak at the Rotary Club of San Bruno today. So I have him to thank and the audience knew who to blame. I really enjoyed the talk and felt very at home with the group. Here is the audio for the core of the talk (I have cut intro and and about ten minutes of Q&A)


Or download from http://traffic.libsyn.com/skmurphy/ThoughtLeadership140806c.mp3

Here is a handout from the talk.


Thought Leadership

A Briefing for San Bruno Rotary, Aug-6-2014 by Sean Murphy, SKMurphy, Inc.

  1. What is thought leadership?
  2. Why will it bring you more business?
  3. How do you get started?

Thought Leadership: Discern the important events and trends at work in the present, predict their likely effects, and offer perspective and actionable advice in time to have an impact.

Thought Leadership In Action

  • Advise prospects and customers on how to overcome their most pressing problems
  • Customers bring you their hard problems, prospects ask you for insight on options

How Does It Bring You More Business?

  • A reputation for expertise means that you get called first
    • You can compete on more than price:  expertise acts as a differentiator
    • Encourages current customers to bring you new challenges
      • May lead to new opportunities and even new offerings for emerging needs

Key Practices for Thought Leadership

  • Careful observation, questions, networking
  • Writing and speaking to build influence

Build a Communication Strategy

  • Identify audience / Understand their needs  / Position your message / Promote
  • Measure success: website traffic, mailing list size, inquiries, customers

Execute: Your 90-day Plan Should Address:

  1. What other people say about you
  2. What you say
  3. What you write
  4. Getting found when people are looking

Topics You Can Always Talk About

  • Change: what’s waxing and waning
  • Significance of recent events
  • Checklists to identify or resolve problems

“The future is an abstraction, all change is happening now.”
Marcelo Rinesi

You can only take action in the present.

“I have gradually come to appreciate that the really important predictions are about the present. What is happening right now, and what is its significance?”
Robert Lucky

What Is The Current Situation / What Is Significant About it?

  • Before you can make predictions you have to understand what’s happened.
  • The easiest predictions are based on the “acorns” already planted in the present

Checklists:  Develop A Coachable Perspective

  • Teach customers and prospect to diagnose problems from symptoms
  • Teach prevention and self-service so that they call you for high value problems

Thought Leadership Brings Business

  • You get called first
  • Compete on more than price
  • New opportunities
  • New offerings

About SKMurphy, Inc.: We help you find leads and close deals

Bootstrappers Breakfast www.bootstrapperbreakfast.com

If you are looking or a speaker for your Silicon Valley business group please contact us. I enjoy giving highly interactive presentations to groups  of 12 to 40 people.  I am happy to talk to larger groups but I prefer where there are opportunities for real audience participation.  I also do a number of interactive webinars and workshops for groups who are not based in Silicon Valley so if that’s of interest please feel free to contact me as well.

Content Creation for Thought Leadership and Lead Generation

Written by Theresa Shafer. Posted in Lead Generation, Thought Leadership

SKMurphy develops highly relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire, and engage customers. We help our clients organize and clearly articulate their experiences and insights in ways that generate inquires. We develop an editorial calendar that  complements SEO strategy and ecosystem partner relationships. We always consider audio, video, and animation options in addition leveraging public speaking events.

Here are a couple of articles that we developed:

And here is some example videos

 

 

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