Quotes For Entrepreneurs– August 2014

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Quotes, skmurphy

You can follow @skmurphy to get these quotes for entrepreneurs hot off the mojo wire or wait until they are collected in a blog post at the end of each month. Enter your E-mail address if you would like have new blog posts sent to you.

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“An early start beats fast running.”
Michael Bowen (@mdcbowen) “Cobb’s Rules

Used as closing quote for “Start with a List of Customers and Problems that Build on Your Experience and Relationships

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“Technology per se is not disruptive or sustaining: it is the way it is deployed in the market.”
Clayton Christensen in “Still Disruptive

This quote inspired me to update “Distant Early Warning Signs of Market Disruption” with a additional paragraph on the need to counter a disruptive entrant where they are taking root, not where you are comfortable selling already.

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“Almost always great new ideas don’t emerge from within a single person or function, but at the intersection of functions or people that have never met before.”
Clayton Christensen in “Still Disruptive

More context

“Almost always great new ideas don’t emerge from within a single person or function, but at the intersection of functions or people that have never met before. And most universities are organised so you don’t have those intersections. They are siloed. Universities think people come up with great ideas by closing the door. The academic tenure process, where you have to publish to journals which are very narrow, stands in the way of great research.” Clayton Christensen in “Still Disruptive

h/t Sandeep De (@sandeepcast) in Intersections/Exaption: Silo Busting

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“In the heart of every apple is an entire orchard waiting only to be planted.”
Thorstan Osborne

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“Cultivate mindfulness: it’s not the fastest reaction, it’s the decision that leads to the first effective response.”
Sean Murphy in “Cultivating Mindfulness”

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“A man should never neglect his family for business.”
Walt Disney quoted in  Ch. 14 : The Real Walt Disney, p. 361

h/t Entrepreneurs Quotes (@entrepreneurship)

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“Start building network, blog, educating 1 year before you make the leap. Build community. The first sales will always be to friends. Make those friends.” Conor Neill in “Entrepreneur: Start a year before you Start

Used as the opening quote for “Start with a List of Customers and Problems that Build on Your Experience and Relationships

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“When Iran develops its fervently sought nuclear weapon, this will look in retrospect like our last carefree summer.”
Abe Greenwald (@abegreenwald) in “Reality is Neoconservative

Looking back August 2014 may  rhyme with August 1914 (“History doesn’t repeat itself, but sometimes it rhymes.” Mark Twain).

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“We’d achieve more if we chased the dream instead of the competition.”
Simon Sinek (@simonsinek)

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“There now ensued a series of incidents which transported me to the opposite extremes of ecstasy and horror; incidents which I tremble to recall and dare not seek to interpret.”
H. P. Lovecraft

This would make a great opening quote for many startup success stories (and more than a few failure stories).

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“To base thought only on speech is to try nailing whispers to the wall. Writing freezes thought and offers it up for inspection.”
Jack Rosenthal

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“Buddy, we’re here in Iowa. Usually, a man’s word is like gold. A handshake is a contract.”
William Nagel in a Washington Post article on Bruce Braley

I think “here in Iowa” is a good metaphor for how effective bootstrappers manage trust. Full quote:

Another neighbor, William Nagel, who sits on the homeowners association board, said, “Buddy, we’re here in Iowa. We talk like men here and we act like men. Usually, a man’s word is like gold. A handshake is a contract. Neighbors are neighbors, and if you’ve got a problem with your neighbor, you talk it out.”

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“It is possible to create an epidemic of health which is self-organizing and self-propelling.”
Jonas Salk

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“You don’t think that seeing your grandparents die or your parents die is good fortune, but you would be wrong.”
Sean Murphy in “Good Fortune.”

I was reminded of this observation by the recent death of John Foster McKenna, age 23.

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“The way to love anything is to realize that it may be lost.”
G. K. Chesterton

Compare to Achaan Chaa’s “when I understand that the glass is already broken, every moment with it is precious” in Mark Epstein’s Thoughts Without a Thinker (pages 80-81) quoted in “Thanksgiving 2011

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“The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but what they miss.”
Thomas Carlyle

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“He who does not understand your silence will probably not understand your words.”
Elbert Hubbard

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“The best teams are motivated by a sense of mission, of working on the worthwhile. When they have a why they will find the how.”
Sean Murphy in “Five Quotes For Entrepreneurs by Branch Rickey

I was inspired by this quote by Branch Rickey:

“First of all, a man, whether seeking achievement on the athletic field or in business, must want to win. He must feel that the thing he is doing is worthwhile; so worthwhile that he is willing to pay the price of success to attain distinction.” Branch Rickey

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“The stories we tell ourselves can serve as straitjackets for stagnation, or scaffolding for transformation.”
Seb Paquet (@sebpaquet) tweet Dec-1-2010

h/t Conal Elliott

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“Bootstrappers are open to possibility but maintain focus: they explore many options but say yes to only a few.”
Sean Murphy

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“I wonder if one of the penalties of growing older is that you become more and more conscious that nothing is very permanent.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

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“When your toil has been a pleasure, you have not earned money merely, but money, health, delight, and moral profit, all in one.”
Robert Louis Stevenson

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“Blessed is the man who has found his work.
Let him ask no other blessedness.”
Thomas Carlyle

h/t Gretchin Rubin Daily Quotes

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“Treat social capital with the same care as cash: trust doesn’t scale, it’s knit by aligning actions with prior commitments.”
Sean Murphy in “Treat Social Capital With The Same Care As Cash

Similar to this observation

“Trust doesn’t scale, it’s built up by repeated interactions over time. That’s what makes it so important.”
Sean Murphy commenting in “Seth Godin: Trust is Even More Scarce Than Attention

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“They are ill discoverers that think there is no land when they see nothing but sea.”
Francis Bacon (1561-1626) – The Advancement of Learning, bk. 2, ch. 7, sect. 5 (1605).

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“Simple, not easy. There’s a difference.”
Ron Jeffries (@RonJeffries)

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“A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes.
It is innocent, unless found guilty.
A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe.
It is guilty, until found effective.”
Edward Teller, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics, 1991, p. 69

h/t Kevin Kelly

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“No one wants advice–only corroboration.”
John Steinbeck

This is true for some but not even for most entrepreneurs in my experience.

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“In the mind of the entrepreneur the future is obvious and imminent.”
Sean Murphy in “The Mind of the Entrepreneur

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“What is a trick the first time one meets it
is a device the second time
and a method the third time.”
W. J. Leveque

h/t Mark Zimmerman in “Creative Devices

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“The only courage that matters is the kind that gets you from one moment to the next.”
Mignon Mclaughlin

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“Happiness is neither virtue nor pleasure nor this thing nor that, but simply growth.
We are happy when we are growing.”
William Butler Yeats

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“Fields can lie fallow but we can’t; we have less time.”
Mignon Mclaughlin

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“Ability proceeds from a fusion of skills, knowledge, understanding and imagination, consolidated by experience.”
Jonathan Rez

h/t Quotes on Design

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“Anything that won’t sell, I don’t want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.”
Thomas Edison

quoted in Daniel Boorstin’s “Cleopatra’s Nose: Essays on the Unexpected”

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“More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.”
Harold J. Smith

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“Acorns were good till bread was found.”
Francis Bacon

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Nadia James’ Daily Checklist for Aligning Efforts With Goals

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in checklist, skmurphy

Nadia James recently posted a thoughtful article on “Why Entrepreneurs Must Stretch to Reach Their Visions of Success” that included the following daily checklist for aligning efforts with goals for your business.

  1. What vision did I have for my personal and work life when I decided to launch a business? (Think of this vision for yourself as your intended nirvana)
  2. How close am I to reaching my entrepreneurial nirvana state?
  3.  What are some key elements of my entrepreneurial nirvana state? How can I break this vision into bite sized milestones?
  4. How can I better operate my business to achieve my milestones?
  5. What can I do today to invest in my future vision?

She suggests that you spend at least 30 minutes a day working “on the business” instead of just working “in the business.” I like the checklist and had some thoughts on how to operationalize it.

What Can I Do Today to Invest in My Future Vision?

I would start with this question on a daily basis, consider actually planning for tomorrow at the end of the day so that you can start with a key list of todo’s (“What can I do tomorrow to invest in my future vision).  As bootstrappers the primary question is where to invest time and focus and how to delegate to others in a manner that communicates the context you want them to operate in, not just the specific task. Explaining your vision for the business in a way that others can act in it is also worth your time.

 How Can I Better Operate My Business to Achieve My Milestones?

I think this question is worth asking at the end of each project milestone you complete or any result you deliver to a customer.  Daily may be too frequently unless you are working on very small deliverables. There are two things to think about in building raw material for an after action:

  • what did I observe that was surprising (or violated my expectations) and
  • what are key metrics I can track so that I don’t rely purely on memory when I do the actual actual lessons learned.

Another trigger for this question could be a regular weekly or monthly review of key metrics that measure “distance traveled” and “distance to goal.”

What Is My Vision For The Business

If you can boil this down to high level goals then you have can construct some decision rules for whether you are moving toward your “True North.” Periodically you may come to understand that key assumptions you made about the world, the market, or yourself were wrong and you need to make adjustments. But I think these adjustments are either in response to clear failures or something that you do more on a quarterly or twice a year basis.

How Can I Break this Vision into Bite Sized Milestones?

I think this is great advice, in particular if you can see how you can build a small viable business that you can scale into your full vision. While the vision is important I think the ability to break it into a sequence of milestones is critical to being able to achieving it. These milestones would typically involve things that are directly under your control:

  • number of sales conversations,
  • saving money to give you more flexibility,
  • completing product features or clearly defining the services that you want to offer.

You also need to define “stopping rules” where you have to reconsider an approach or even your commitment to the business so that you can be objective in the face of setbacks.

What does entrepreneurial success mean to you? What milestones must you hit to get there?

How Close Am I to Reaching My Entrepreneurial Vision?

By definition I think your goals evolve as you achieve key aspects of your vision.

 “Ah, but a man’s reach should exceed his grasp,
Or what’s a heaven for?”
Robert Browning

 

Entrepreneurs Blend Passion and Prudent Risk Taking

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, Design of Experiments, skmurphy

Successful entrepreneurs are fueled by a passion to change the world tempered by prudent risk taking. Many risks have to be managed on an ongoing basis cannot be eliminated once and for by careful planning or the achievement of a particular milestone:

  • managing cash flow and the risk of a downturn,
  • meeting your obligations to your family as well as your business,
  • continually developing new skills and connections to cope with evolving customer needs and new competitive threats.

Noam Wasserman had an article yesterday’s Wall Street Journal on “How an Entrepreneur’s Passion Can Destroy a Startup” that focused on entrepreneurial passion and prudent risk taking. He has some excellent advice with regards to a shared risk analysis with your spouse (and a plan how to decided when to quit before you are in the middle of the roller coaster ride) and identifying potential risks and problems with you plan (what Gary Klein has called a “pre-mortem” in other contexts is incredibly useful for a startup team to do periodically, not as a way of hanging crepe but of anticipating and preventing or mitigating foreseeable problems).

Here is a list of risks he identified

Wasserman Tests: Excess Entrepreneurial Passion

Wasserman Test: Do You … SKMurphy Commentary
Feel like you are on mission to change the world? This is a good thing.
I think this is probably a good thing. Doesn’t mean you should prepare to run your business. But if align your business with a higher purpose I think you are more likely to persevere.
Get insulted when someone points out legitimate flaws in your idea or product? This is a red flag, but it  may be as much about personal maturity as anything else.
Find it hard to come up with pitfalls you might face or to detail a worst case scenario for your venture? This is a red flag, but it may be less about passion and more a lack of knowledge about business or your industry. You need to do premortem’s periodically to prepare for problems and mitigate those you can.
Raise money from professional investors when your #1 goal is to “work for myself” or “to control my own destiny”? I think this is a low probability situation.
This can happen but normally entrepreneurs motivated by a desire for autonomy don’t seek professional investment and those that do are typically screened out as part of due diligence.
Hire friends and family whom you may not be able to fire if they underperform or circumstances change, because you are confident you won’t face those issues? I think this is a low probability situation.
If the business is not doing well typically friends and family want out, if it’s doing well you can often find people role that fits their talents if they worked with you in the beginning.
Neglect to run careful tests to assess consumer demand? This is an ongoing challenge not something you can ever fix or satisfy.
Large business fail at new product launches quite frequently as well, I think this is less a passion problem and more something that is very hard to do.
Assume you won’t need a financial cushion in case the venture takes longer than anticipated to generate income? This is an ongoing challenge not something you can ever fix or satisfy.
Sometimes it’s the fact that a team is almost broke that forces them to make the necessary changes to succeed.
Resist talking honestly with your significant other about the money and the time you expect to commit to your venture, and about the potential pitfalls you face? This is a real risk. This is a hard conversation but one that has to happen frequently. You have to treat you spouse or significant other as a member of the board of directors. I don’t think this is a passion problem per se, but failure to make a joint decision and keep them informed is a real risk.
Figure you don’t need to address the holes in your skills or networks in advance of founding? This is an ongoing challenge not something you can ever fix or satisfy.
There are always holes in your skills, consumer demand changes require new skills, competitors attack you in unanticipated ways that require new expertise, your network is never broad enough. I don’t think you are ever prepared enough and you have to be learning and connecting on an ongoing basis

I was struck by one paragraph:

For instance, almost 800 founders took a predictive test that evaluated their startup ideas, and then received recommendations about the next steps they ought to take. Thomas Astebro and his colleagues found that a sizable percentage of founders who received a recommendation to halt progress on their startups because the idea wasn’t commercially viable kept going anyway—29% of this group kept spending money, and 51% kept spending time, developing their idea. On average, they doubled their losses before giving up on pursuing their idea.

It Does Not Help To Tell An Entrepreneur Their Idea is Not Viable

It’s not helpful to tell entrepreneurs that their idea is not commercially viable. All new ideas are not commercially viable when judged by “conventional wisdom” until conventional wisdom changes.  Entrepreneurs are probably even less inclined to take advice from college professors who have never started a company. If you could reliably predict the economic viability of new idea you would not be selling analytics you would be making  investments.  Here is Thomas Asterbo’s bio from Genesis Analytics

Tom Astebro is currently Associate Professor in Management Sciences at the University of Waterloo. He has seven years of experience in scorecard development. Tom developed the Genesis algorithms and technology as part of research at the University of Waterloo that was sponsored by CIBC and Nortel and earned the distinction as the creator of one of the three “Most Promising Technologies” in a recent Canadian competition.

Tom has published 29 articles, made 49 presentations at conferences, obtained research funding from NSERC, SSHRC, MMO, Carnegie Mellon, Telia, Volvo, Handelsbanken, and the Sweden-America Foundation and won ten international/national research awards. His research has been mentioned in Business Week, the Financial Post, the Globe and Mail and the Ottawa Citizen. He has worked as a management consultant for banks, insurance and manufacturing companies in Canada, Sweden and the Netherlands and has taught at Universities in Canada, the U.S., Sweden and Australia. Tom holds a Ph.D. in Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.B.A and a M.Sc. from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.

Encourage Prudent Risk Taking But Don’t Try and Blunt Passion

What is very helpful is to get entrepreneurs to test their key assumptions–”what else would have to be true for your business to work”–and get them to start testing critical aspects of a plan. When a peer entrepreneur is working on a idea that you don’t think is viable, it doesn’t help to tell them “I don’t think it will work” or even “Here is why I don’t think it would work.”

Instead,  think about framing it as

  • What risks are you worried about?
  • Here are three challenges I think you business has to overcome to be viable. Do you have evidence or results that indicate that this won’t be a problem?
  • What could you do to test or explore how to work around these problems before investing time and money in other activities that don’t attack the riskiest areas first.”

What Would Have To Be True For For Startup to Thrive?

This approach to helping an entrepreneur think  through their risks and challenges is something we try and do at a Bootstrapper Breakfast when someone says what they are working on and another attendees says something like “that’s a crappy idea or that will never work.”

We try and get them to think through “what would have to be true for it to work? What are the key challenges they have to manage to make it work?” Because entrepreneurs can always tell their friends with “real jobs” about what they are working on and either be told, “that’s not viable” or “that’s great” (meaning please stop talking about this) and not get useful feedback or critique.

Related Blog Posts

Customer Interviews: Spend an Hour to Save a Minute

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, Customer Development, Lean Startup, Rules of Thumb

For customer interviews we have a rule of thumb that if an hour or research saves a minute early in the conversation it’s a good investment.  When you look at the list of questions you have prepared to learn about the prospect’s business and their needs, it’s easy to say to yourself, “I am really busy I can just ask these at the start to ‘set the table.’” But there are significant risks with this approach.

Preparations Cuts Risk Of Customer Interviews Ending Prematurely

While the interview may be nominally scheduled for 15 minutes or a half-hour and may run an hour if it goes well the first six minute or so  are critical to communicating that you have done your homework on their situation and their needs. If you start to ask questions that are already published on-line you can appear lazy or unprepared. If you can do research on a prospect in advance, it’s worth spending an hour to save a minute in the conversation. You can even start the conversation by saying “when I prepared for this conversation here is what I learned about your firm” and give a brief summary of what you know about their situation.

It’s OK to say “I see on your website that you have hired four people in the last three months, how has that impacted …” or “I read a profile of your firm in the San Jose Business Journal Book of Lists, have you grown beyond the 12 people listed in February?” This shows that you have done your homework and don’t want to waste their time but need to confirm some of the key facts that may bear on their needs.

Information Sources To Consult Prior To Customer Interviews

  • Do a thorough review of the prospect’s website.
  • Search for any articles in the last two years at least to see what kind of press coverage they have received.
  • Review the Linkedin profiles for the firm, the person you are talking to, and anyone with similar titles or in the same department.
  • Review on-line postings in relevant forums for the industry.
  • See if they have a blog, a twitter account, a YouTube account, and similar social media sits that are often used for business purposes.

Six Questions That You Normally Have to Ask In The Conversation

  1. Prospect’s description of the problem in their own words. This is rarely more than a sentence or two and capturing the essence in their own words is key.
  2. High level description of current work process or work flow in their own words. This forms the basis for any delta comparison or differentiation of your solution.
  3. Any constraints they mention: if you hear the same ones multiple times you will more than likely have to satisfy them.
  4. How they will tell that a new solution will leave them better off: this is different from asking them to specify the solution, it’s asking for “future state” or the end result they would like to achieve.
  5. What else they have tried to do to solve the problem: probe for why they were not satisfactory.
  6. Key metrics or figures of merit they would use to evaluate a new outcome.

Closing Thoughts

“A month in the laboratory can often save an hour in the library.”
F. H. Westheimer

Entrepreneurs seem to divide into two camps:

  • those who want to have a conversation immediately, and
  • those who are quite content to research for months as long as they don’t have to talk to strangers.

Striking a balance is the key to maximizing your learning from a customer interview. Effective research prior to the customer interview allows you to

  • Ask better questions
  • Provide evidence of your commitment to developing a mutually satisfactory business relationship
  • Detect when your prospect is leaving something out or perhaps coloring the situation too much. You are not a stenographer there to capture whatever they say without reflection, but if your only source of information is what they tell you then you risk “garbage in, garbage out” in your product plans and MVP.

Related Posts

By Sunday Night Your Chips Are Down For The Week

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in skmurphy

“So let us not talk falsely now, the hour is getting late”
Bob Dylan “All along the watchtower

Sunday nights are difficult times for me. Friday night you can say, well I have another 48 hours to finish what I promised by the end of the week. But by Sunday night the week is over all of your commitments are marked to market. Your chips are down. Whatever bets you have been able to place will have to bear fruit in the coming days to weeks.

Sunday Night Your Commitments Are Marked to Market

Most of the commitments I miss are not to family or friends or clients or prospect but to myself. Jeff Leader and I worked together in Leader-Murphy in the mid-90′s (I wish I had held on to that www.l-m.com domain name) he observed to me at the end of a particularly long work day: “You are a geyser of ideas. But we don’t need any more ideas, we need to finish this book we have started.” We never did. It was 1994 and we had a theory that corporations would use websites for internal collaboration, customer support, and real time governance and control. Sometimes you can see the future you just can’t get it down on paper. We did build more than 30 websites for firms and technical conferences in 1994-1996 but very little of what we built directly survives today.

We started SKMurphy, Inc. 11 years ago by helping two technical consulting companies find new clients: PicoCraft and New Idea Engineering. It was nuclear winter in Silicon Vally after the dotcom crash and it was time to see if the could persist long enough to find the next spring. Both firms are still active today and we continue to assist them.

It’s not a bad feeling to see companies that you have helped prosper.

“In my experience, most people don’t schedule their work.
They schedule the interruptions that prevent their work from happening.”
Mike Monteiro in “The Chokehold of Calendars

 



Q: How Do I Calculate Business Model Parameters For A Novel Product

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, skmurphy

Q: How can I go about calculating  Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC),  Customer Lifetime Value (LTV), and other business model parameters for a technology that I will use to attack an entirely new market with no historical data?

While there may be “new markets with no historical data” there are no new markets that cannot be benchmarked against existing markets by asking these two questions:

  • What do people stop paying for to pay for you offering?
  • What do people stop spending time on to spend time on your offering?

What do the Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) Customer Lifetime Value (LTV) look like for these substitutes?

Elicit Symptoms From Prospects

Alternatively what symptoms will prospects admit to having? They won’t read articles or click on adwords or watch videos about problems that they don’t know they have or believe they may be affected by.  An effective approach in the early market  is to interview prospects to find unmet needs, persistent problems, and goals at risk.

We Measure the New By the Familiar

The reason why light bulbs were measured in candlepower and steam engines (and later internal combustion engines and then electric motors) were expressed as horsepower. Henry Ford observed in “My Life and Work“ that, “A horseless carriage was a common idea…ever since the steam engine was invented…” We call a horseless carriage a car.

Things that are genuinely new are mysteries and don’t become news until they can be expressed as part of a familiar context or by analogy to a familiar example. Alan Kay gave a great talk on this last point that was recently highlighted by Jim McGee, “Alan Kay on Invention vs. Innovation.

What Job Will Your Prospect Hire Your Product For?

What is the job that prospects will hire your app to do? The phonograph was probably one of the most discontinuous innovations of the last few centuries. Here are some examples that Thomas Edison offered for the phonograph to North American Review in June 1878:
  1. Letter writing and all kinds of dictation without the aid of a stenographer.
  2. Phonographic books, which will speak to blind people without effort on their part.
  3. The teaching of elocution.
  4. Reproduction of music.
  5. The “Family Record”–a registry of sayings, reminiscences, etc., by members of a family in their own voices, and of the last words of dying persons.
  6. Music-boxes and toys.
  7. Clocks that should announce in articulate speech the time for going home, going to meals, etc.
  8. The preservation of languages by exact reproduction of the manner of pronouncing.
  9. Educational purposes; such as preserving the explanations made by a teacher, so that the pupil can refer to them at any moment, and spelling or other lessons placed upon the phonograph for convenience in committing to memory.
  10. Connection with the telephone, so as to make that instrument an auxiliary in the transmission of permanent and invaluable records, instead of being the recipient of momentary and fleeting communication.

Related Blog Posts

Five Blogger Outreach Mistakes To Avoid

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Lead Generation, skmurphy, Thought Leadership

I got the following unsolicited E-mail this morning; I think the marketing term for this is “blogger outreach.” I have redacted the name of the sender (“YYY”) and the name of the firm/product (“XXX”) but “[press kit]” and “[review/checkout]” were included verbatim in the original. There was no footer with an unsubscribe option although phone number and address were included after the person’s title.

Good Afternoon,

My name is YYY from XXX. We have developed an online innovation platform that allows businesses to create insight-driven ideation networks.

Each company has their own ideation network allowing them to set ‘challenges’ to their employees, and employees  are able to suggest ideas to solve these challenges.

XXX is exciting and completely different to anything else on the market in that anybody can sign up at XXX and start their innovation network for free within minutes (much like Yammer). All you need to get started is an organisational email address.

I thought you and your readers might be interested in our service. We’re currently in beta at XXX, with currently over 120 companies signed up and using the product since a very soft launch last month. I have a [press kit] I’d like to send your way to [review/checkout] if you’d be interested, and if there’s anything else I can help with let me know!

Thanks,

YYY
Head of Product
<phone number and address>

One Good Thing and Five Mistakes

Good Thing: It’s from a real person with a phone number, physical address and personal email address.

Five mistakes:

  1. Impersonal
  2. No Pricing
  3. No Target Customer
  4. Premature Send
  5. No Unsubscribe

Impersonal

“Good Morning” as an opening is mean to be a catch all. While politer than “To Whom It May Concern” it would be better to format this as an announcement. If you cannot take the time to personalize an email it has substantially less impact, or more accurately less positive impact.

No Price

I wondered how much this would cost. I checked the FAQ where there is a question:

How much does XXX cost?

Full details of our simple pricing structure is available on our pricing page.

But there is no pricing page, which indicates to me they have not worked out their business model. If this were intended to be a freemium app that might be OK, but idea management systems normally capture company proprietary data so it’s unlikely most companies want their internal process improvement ideas or their new product ideas posted on the Internet.

No Target Customer

The FAQ also has this question

Who uses XXX

Organisations of all shapes and sizes from across the globe use XXX. Due to the ease of getting started, organisations with as few as 10 employees are benefitting from using XXX, and thanks to its customisation capabilities, XXXis suitable for large enterprises too.

Based on this FAQ answer it does not appear anyone is actually using your product, or they have not figured out who their target customer is.

Premature Send

This sentence: “I have a [press kit] I’d like to send your way to [review/checkout] if you’d be interested, and if there’s anything else I can help with let me know!” leads me to believe they were not done editing the mass e-mail template before they hit send.

No Unsubscribe Option

This is clearly a mass e-mail without an unsubscribe option, technically it’s “unsolicited commercial e-mail” or “spam.”

Summary

I am not entirely clear on the thought process that leads a startup team to craft this e-mail as an outreach strategy.  Their about page says “After lots of long nights and coffee runs, the first release of XXX was unleashed on our first customers in April 2014.” Unleashed would be a good verb for what happened with this “blogger outreach” campaign.

An Entrepreneur Is A Change Agent

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, skmurphy, Video

I like this 2009 video by Grasshopper “Entrepreneurs Can Change The World” that portrays the entrepreneur as a change agent and celebrates the freedom and economic opportunities that America has traditionally offered immigrants.

Here is the transcript from the Grasshopper site with some observations interspersed

Do you remember when you were a kid and you thought you could do anything? You still can. Because a lot of what we consider impossible is easy to overcome. Because in case you haven’t noticed, we live in a place where one individual can make a difference.

Want proof? Just look at the people who built our country: our parents, grandparents, our aunts, uncles. They were immigrants, newcomers ready to make their mark. Maybe they came with very little, or perhaps they didn’t own anything except for a single brilliant idea.

These people were thinkers, doers, innovators until they came up with the name entrepreneurs. They change the way we think about what is possible. They have a clear vision of how life can be better for all of us, even when times are tough.

The ability to look at a situation with “newcomer’s eyes” is a key element to unlocking creativity. So is time pressure and limited resources.

Right now, it’s hard to see when our view is cluttered with obstacles, but turbulence creates opportunities for success, achievement and pushes us to discover new ways of doing things.

So what opportunities will you go after and why?

If you’re an entrepreneur, you know that risk isn’t the reward. No. The rewards are driving innovation, changing people’s lives, creating jobs, fueling growth, and making a better world.

Entrepreneurs are everywhere. They run small businesses that support our economy, design tools to help you stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues around the world, and they’re finding new ways of helping to solve society’s oldest problems.

Successful innovation results when entrepreneurs manage their own shortcomings,  find a  problem they care about, and approach it from different angles with small safe-to-fail experiments.

Do you know an entrepreneur?

Entrepreneurs can be anyone, even you. So seize the opportunity to create the job you always wanted. Help heal the economy. Make a difference. Take your business to new heights.

But most importantly, remember when you were a kid, when everything was within your reach, and then say to yourself quietly, but with determination: It still is.

I have come to the conclusion that most entrepreneurial careers are involuntary, undertaken by “mavericks, iconoclasts, dropouts, and misfits” to quote Sramana Mitra. The trick is to minimize the amount of wasted effort by doing less with less in a way that builds on existing relationships, knowledge, and successes.

Related Articles

The soundtrack to the video is “Chain Reaction” by Carly Comando; she also composed  “Everyday” for Noah Kalina’s “Noah takes a photo of himself every day for 6 years.

 

Q: Side Payment Requested In Negotiation

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Rules of Thumb, skmurphy

Q: We have been in customer discovery for a few months and have a situation in a negotiation that I am not sure how to deal with. A decision maker at a potential customer says he believes that our product can help but it’s not addressing a burning problem. The wrinkle that I have not encountered before: he says he would like to pursue this idea on his own so he wants us to compensate him for the ideas he is bringing. Any advice on how to look at the situation or how best to handle it?

Some Questions to Consider:

  • Who owns the ideas that he gave you?
  • Has he disclosed them to his company?
  • Are they his ideas or the company’s property?
  • Have you signed a non-disclosure either with him personally or with the company?
  • Did he give you the ideas freely or did he ask to be paid before he disclosed them?
  • Are there patents involved or does he plan to patent them?

If he is asking for a personal payment made to him, and not to the company, but it’s something you plan to sell to his company then you are walking into an ethical minefield. If he plans to pursue them himself it’s probably better to let him go on his way and talk to other folks who are not conflicted.

Act As If Everything You Do Will Become Public

As a rule of thumb it’s best to act as if everything that you do will become fully know to all of the parties involved or affected by your actions.  This side payment request does not sound like it would pass that test the way that you have described it.

If his company is not aware of the fact that he has ideas for improving internal processes or workflows and he is trying to sell them to you there are some potential conflicts there.

Normal Negotiation Flow For New Technology

Normally what would happen is that they would disclose to your their needs, specific ideas for functionality and perhaps implementation options, constraints that your solution  has to observe, and other relevant factors. You would either develop a custom product that is their property (work for hire) or you would develop a product you could sell to them and to others. The product might be sold at a discount to them to reflect their contribution, they might ask that you not sell it to named competitors for a a period of time (6,12,24 months).  In the first case you would be developing a custom implementation, in the second case you would be developing a solution that they would like to become an industry standard–perhaps after enjoying a temporary period of advantage over competitors–and they want to spread the cost of development across many players in the industry.

You Normally Don’t Make Side Payments

You don’t normally make side payments to individuals. One exception might be that the other party wants to leave his current job at your prospect company and come to work directly for you. But you want to be very careful about making payments to employees of firms or government agencies that you are trying to do business with. The employer may view it as a bribe or kickback. This is also true for offers of stock or stock options in your firm and payments to relatives or entities controlled by the employee but not part of the prospect company.

Related Blog Posts

  • Honesty In Negotiations
    I always assume that at some point in the future the folks I am negotiating will know the full truth of the situation and that very few secrets remain that way for long.
  • Building a Business Requires Building Trust
    Working with bootstrappers sometimes puts us on teams that are in desperate circumstances. Where they are able to translate time pressure and resource starvation into a bias for action from a change in perspective they often succeed–or at least move beyond the current crisis: success, like the horizon, is an imaginary line you can approach but never seen to cross. But where they use it as an excuse to take shortcuts that abuse prospects trust we sometimes have to part company.
  • The Lucky and the Wise
    It can be hard to assess whose advice to take about your business. One reason for cultivating at least a kitchen cabinet of informal advisors if not a more formal advisory board is that a diversity of perspectives can normally provide more insights into opportunities, risks, and options for managing them. Advice from a lucky entrepreneur tends to be very specific and suggest a “copy exactly” model, a wise entrepreneur will offer principles and several alternatives with one or two approaches recommended as most likely to succeed or least risky.
  • Treat Social Capital With The Same Care as Cash
    Trust Doesn’t Scale, It’s Knit by Aligning Actions With Prior Commitments

Thought Leadership: Rotary Club Four Way Test

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Thought Leadership

When I spoke on Thought Leadership at the San Bruno Rotary Club on August 6 this “four way test” was printed on all of the placemats. It was the first time I had encountered it and I found it a useful insight for evaluating a course of action.

Of the things we think, say or do:

  • Is it the TRUTH?
  • Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  • Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  • Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

As I have reflected on the event in the interim I realized that this simple test, developed by Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 to turn around his failing company, was a great example of thought leadership. I had defined thought leadership as the ability to

Discern the important events and trends at work in the present, predict their likely effects, and offer perspective and actionable advice in time to have an impact.

This test offers a way to detect whether an organization or community is healthy. If people are not able to tell the truth, are not fair to other stakeholders, are not promoting goodwill and friendship, and are not seeking out comes that are generally beneficial, then the organization or community will not thrive.

References

Few Against Many Requires Focus and Perseverance

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, 2 Open for Business Stage, skmurphy

We Happy Few

The fewer men, the greater share of honour. [...]
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
Henry V in Act IV Scene iii 18–67. “St. Crispin’s Day speech”

A college kid in a dorm room starts assembling and selling person computers.. Two college dropouts–or recent graduates–start building hardware in a garage. A woman starts a software consulting business in her second bedroom, then creates a software product. Four men in a pie shop sketch a design for a personal computer. All startups by definition start small and attract founders who welcome the independence. Perhaps they have failed in a larger  firm or they have become disillusioned working in one, perhaps they have never worked a large company and have no idea what’s really involved.

These startups often face competition from established incumbents who have more people, better financial resources, and relationships with customers. Their success in a niche can attract the attention of larger players either intentionally through their messaging or when prospects they have approached turn to existing vendors to provide similar functionality.

Marathon Not a Sprint

First time entrepreneurs often romanticize the speed and power of working in a small team, but experienced entrepreneurs understand that established firms often fight back very effectively: no market of with any value is uncontested and it’s going to be a marathon not a sprint.

“History seems to indicate that breakthroughs are usually the result of a small group of capable people fending off a larger group of equally capable people with a stake in the status quo.”
George Heilmeier in “A Moveable Feast” [PDF] 2005 Kyoto Prize Lecture

The team has to set a sustainable pace from the beginning. This often means not only work/life balance–keeping all of the critical commitments you have made to friends and family in addition to your co-founders–but work/work balance: finding a way to generate revenue, to bootstrap, while you are exploring the market and building the first and sometimes subsequent version of your product. Not every new product is an immediate success.

Startups are incredibly hard work. They require that you maintain good relationships with your family and friends and continue to participate in the communities you are a member of so that you can get support and useful perspective when you need it. Very few real products are built in a (long) weekend or a week or even a month or two. Plan for at least nine to 18 months of hard work where there are a number of “sprints” that are a few days to a week of concentrated work. But the team has to be able to sustain creative problem solving for a period of probably two years before it’s clear you have traction, at which point the game gets much harder as your competitors start to go to school on your success.

Cameron Moll explores the challenges of a team of two or three competing with a team of twenty in “Things Take Time

The team of twenty has quantity on its side — more hands and specialists to execute the work. With that, of course, comes all the red tape, political baggage, and countless meetings that accompany such teams and the organizations that employ them. Quantity suffers at the hand of seemingly endless structure.

The team of two or three has independence on its side — they call the shots, whenever and however they choose. With that, of course, comes all the requisite components for supporting and maintaining the thing they’re creating. Customer support, billing, advertising, blogging, tweeting, client and customer acquisition, and the like. Time suffers at the hand of a seemingly endless to-do list.

The independent team soon realizes that speed isn’t a luxury; its currency is late nights and long weekends. For those who prefer to keep a semi-regular schedule and who have other things to care for outside of work, we eventually learn to accept that things just take longer than we hope they’d take. Problem solving takes time. Details take time. [...]

I’m learning, rather forcibly I suppose, to be okay with things taking time. I’m also learning that often you end up with a better product when you take your time to get all the big and small details just right. It’s time well-spent.

It’s OK to take this time if you are in direct communication with customers who are willing to pay for the product. It’s a mistake to spend all of your time in the workshop if you have not had a number of conversations with prospects and closed some opportunities.

Avoid The Strong Points Of Established Firms

A larger company can work a startup into the ground unless you are careful in your choice of product and niche market: a frontal assault is typically beaten back. Startups have to choose how they will compete very carefully. In the “Bootstraper Manifesto” Seth Godin lists five key leverage points that many established companies enjoy: distribution, access to capital, brand equity, customer relationships, and great employees. Here is a brief explanation of each and some approaches that a startup can use to counter these advantages.

  1. Distribution: they are able to get the product in front of the customer.
    Counter: Sell directly, or find partners unwilling to work with larger firms
  2. Access to Capital: they can borrow a lot of money.
    Counter: Frugality, be smart about which problems you tackle, leverage existing team expertise.
  3. Brand Equity: if the prospect already knows about the company and the product it substantially reduces their perception of risk in making a purchase.
    Counter: go to firms who are unattractive to larger firms or not well served by them.
  4. Customer Relationships: especially in B2B with approved vendor lists and existing contracts.
    Counter: chase smaller deals, chase deals where you bring enough advantage someone will fight to put you on the list.
  5. Great Employees: talented people with low tolerance for risk are delighted to work in established firms. Entrepreneurs greatly overestimate most people’s appetite for risk, especially as passengers in their race car.
    Counter: provide opportunities for folks with appropriate experience who may be less desirable to larger firms. Examples of this might be older engineers, women who want to work part time because they have small children, people with less experience but more enthusiasm for learning.

More generally you need to configure your business model so that you are either pursuing opportunities that are less attractive to larger firms or your product violates one or more key requirements for their business. This may mean:

  • Chasing smaller deals to get traction and establish your brand.
  • Not implementing some functionality that your competitors have that your prospect don’t find valuable, enabling you to get to market faster and at a lower price.
  • Providing additional services that a larger firm either doe not have the expertise for.
  • Providing additional services that won’t necessarily work at scale but allows you to further differentiate your offering for your target nice.
  • Configuring or customizing a version of your product more rapidly or more completely than your competition.

Focus and Perseverance Means Saying No

Fast Company called work/life balance “bunk” a decade ago because “hungry” labor was going to work us into the ground. If you are able to substitute working smarter or working more intimately with customers for working more cheaply you can likely avoid this fate. Successful bootstrappers remain open to possibilities–especially the possibility that they are mistaken in one or more of their business hypotheses–but maintain focus: they explore many options but say yes to only a few.

One of the reasons I am excited about Discovery Kanban as a model for not only larger firms but startups is that entrepreneurs, especially bootstrapping entrepreneurs, have to husband their resources but find a way to explore the market. This means being explicit about the amount of effort that will be invested in developing and exploring options, and being very crisp on commitments. Discovery Kanban offers a framework for managing risks, options, probes, and committed projects from a consistent  perspective: we can only focus on a few things at a time, what are they?

Related Posts

David Binetti On The Mind of the Entrepreneur

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Customer Development, skmurphy

In the mind of the entrepreneur the future is obvious and imminent. This  “reality distortion field” can be useful for making a better future possible, but it inclines the entrepreneur to minimize adoption risk–people will see the benefits of my product immediately and adopt it–and to be impatient. Customer development techniques allow you to identify expensive false positives for potential markets and to refine your approach.

I have been reviewing the presentations from Startup Lessons Learned 2010 and 2011 again and realized that I had never blogged about 2011 presentation “Lessons Learned Pivoting Votizen” by David Binetti (@dbinetti). His key take-away on the value of a customer development is that is helps the entrepreneur avoid expensive false positives, in particular the kind that can happen when you fall victim to your own reality distortion field and are overoptimistic about market risk.

Clip For The Mind Of the Entrepreneur

This clip starts at the 5 minute 40 second mark in David Binetti’s presentation at Startup Lessons Learned 2011 and gives a little context before “Phrenology of the Entrepreneur” slide shown below.

Slide For Phrenology Of the Entrepreneur

Here is the deck starting at the “Phrenology of the Entrepreneur” slide (19).

Related Posts

Update Aug-21: Source of the Phrenology Image this blog post from July 29 2008 on BzzAgent blog: Phrenology of the Entrepreneur

Having worked with several entrepreneurs throughout my career, I’ve noticed precisely nine common traits that unite them together and distinguish them from the rest of us. But what’s particularly interesting is this: just as these characteristics unify entrepreneurs into a discrete group, so too do they corral those who work for them into a community of their own. You see, entrepreneurs inadvertently create a culture in which the staff that survive bond over the realization that it is not each of them that is crazy.

Enter Exhibit A: This post. I wrote this post because our entrepreneur/leader constantly complains that too few blog posts are being submitted. I decided to write minimal text, and instead let the image speak for itself. After reviewing the post, our entrepreneur/leader informed me that “we” (another baffling entrepreneurial habit is to use plural pronouns when assigning tasks to an individual) need to add more text to make this post more about “the business” (code for “the entrepreneur,” himself?). So that’s what I am doing. And, in doing so, I have found myself reconsidering the image, itself. Perhaps the size of the rearmost lobe (labeled “self-esteem,” which was polite for “ego”), should be, err, adjusted.

 

Direct link to image http://www.bzzagent.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/phrenology-of-the-entrepreneur.jpg

Don’t Get Distracted Raising Venture Capital

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 1 Idea Stage, skmurphy

It’s not a mistake to accept venture capital if your business merits and requires it for growth. Don’t get distracted seeking it until then.

“The seductive narrative of Silicon Valley stars a genius-hero who goes on a journey, overcomes myriad obstacles, has a flash of insight and is rewarded by wise and benevolent investors with Series A funding. This narrative is bullshit, but it’s everywhere.

Venture capital is not a rags to riches story. It’s the inspiring tale of redeploying resources from a lower- to a higher-performing asset class. There’s nothing wrong with that – I find it kind of magical – but let’s not pretend we’re doing something else. In particular, let’s not pretend that this is an engine for social justice. You need a separate corporate philanthropy branch for that.”

Rachel Chalmers “Five Reasons Not To Raise Venture Capital

Here are her five reasons

  1. You probably won’t get a fair hearing.
  2. Raising venture capital doesn’t make you a good person.
  3. Most companies won’t ever generate venture outcomes.
  4. When you raise venture, you narrow your options.
  5. Venture math is a harsh mistress.

I think she misses the real top five:

  1. It’s not saying no to a real term sheet that is a mistake, it’s wasting time seeking investment instead of learning about the market.
  2. Writing a business plan or business model canvas is not nearly as useful as writing your customer interview questions or a one page sales pitch. Getting feedback on either  from customers will tell you more than feedback from a VC on a business plan.
  3. Asking prospect for money for an MVP tells you much much more about the market than any feedback from a VC.
  4. What can sound like advice on direction from a VC is actually a no. For example:  “this is interesting but we think addressing problem X or Market Y is more promising, think about it and come back and talk to us again.”)
  5. If you think money will solve your problems, you don’t have a good handle on your problems.

Affluenza victims, regardless of their socioeconomic level, falsely believe that money can solve all their problems.
Jon Winokur

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Direct Mail: Letters and Postcards Still Work

Written by Theresa Shafer. Posted in Lead Generation, skmurphy

Direct Mail: A Letter With a Stamp Is Not Spam

In advertising it pays to be different. Letters and postcards with real stamps get through.

With everyone getting some much email SPAM, direct mail can be a way to differentiate yourself.

Postcards Work Too

We have used postcards to announce events where clients will be speaking or exhibiting. They have been very useful for raising awareness, increasing attendance at the event, and triggering a few phone calls. They don’t have to be opened to be read and are an inexpensive way to send a color image.

Getting Started

  • Consider using unique URLs or phone numbers if you really want to track effectiveness.
  • You can rent mailing lists or use your own.
  • Because of the cost of this method you need to be careful to debug the message in advance: consider small targeted mailings, e-mail tests, adwords tests, or feedback from a few customers and prospects if time is short.
  • We have used Overnight Prints and VistaPrint for printing as well as more than one visit to Fedex/Kinkos when time ran short.

Consider direct mail as an option for the target prospects you are trying to reach.

Arun Kumar: 9 Lessons Learned Bootstrapping Kerika

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Rules of Thumb, skmurphy

I interviewed Arun Kumar in 2012 on his experiences bootstrapping Kerika. It’s a long interview but really gives you a sense of his journey as an entrepreneur, his insights into the future of global teams and how they will collaborate, and a candid list of lessons learned. Here are nine key take-aways that he offered in that interview from bootstrapping Kerika since 2002.

Nine Lessons Learned Bootstrapping Kerika

  1. Don’t spend too much time on market research.  After some point, you are not discovering anything new; you are just hearing the same points being rephrased in different ways.  Move faster into building your first couple of versions.
  2. If the feature is really important, it’s not free. Be very careful about what open-source products or libraries you incorporate into your own product.
  3. Watch users where possible; don’t rely upon them to tell you what they are having difficulties with.  People often don’t articulate problems if they think they will look stupid in doing so, and sometimes people don’t even realize what problems they are having.  With face-to-face contact and conversation you can find out what people want to achieve, which is often different from what they are complaining about.
  4. Users will use your product in ways you never considered.  That’s a good thing. Even if that particular use case wasn’t the one that you envisioned originally, that’s an opportunity not a problem.
  5.  You can’t push on a string: when you are trying to find your product-market fit, you need to find a use case where someone is pulling on the other end.
  6. You will almost never fire someone too soon.
  7. Get all the details right.  Concepts are great, but execution is what matters.
  8. There are no instant successes: every successful company has a revisionist history that makes its founders look unusually brilliant.
  9. You can fail by misfortune, but are unlikely to succeed by chance.

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Ilya Semin on “Bootstrapping DataNyze to $1M/ARR” Sep-5-2014 in Palo Alto

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Events, skmurphy

steaming hot coffee and serious conversation with bootstrapping entrepreneursIlya Semin, founder of Datanyze, joins us at the Palo Alto Bootstrapper Breakfast 7:30am on Fri-Sep-5-2014 at Hobees in Palo Alto. Ilya will share what he learned bootstrapping Datanyze to $1M+ ARR and 9 employees. DataNyze provides competitive intelligence for Web analytics, Widgets, CDN, DNS, and related firms. It can answer questions like “Who are my competitor’s biggest customers?” and “Which customers are evaluating one of my competitors?”

Where: Hobees, 4224 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, CA
When: 7:30am to 9am Friday, September 5, 2014
Cost:  is $5 in advance and $10 at the door plus the cost of your breakfast, tax, and tip.
Register: http://www.meetup.com/Bootstrappers-Breakfast-SV/events/198423522/

Limited Seating please register in advance.

More On Ilya Semin and DataNyze

John Foster McKenna 1990-2014

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in skmurphy

John Foster McKenna: the tragedy of death at an early ageJohn Foster McKenna: December 4, 1990 – August 8, 2014

“Man that is born of a woman hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay. In the midst of life we are in death…”
Book of Common Prayer: Order for the Burial of the Dead

Theresa and I met with John Foster McKenna at his father’s request about four  years ago. He was contemplating a career in business after college and  his father asked us to offer our perspective on sales and marketing and give him advice on books, types of courses, and  companies to consider. He was an earnest and direct young man, possessed of an athlete’s grace,  who was clearly willing to work hard and would likely prosper in whatever he set his mind to.

John McKenna was home for the holidays in 2012, relaxing in a touch football game when he suffered a seizure for the first time. I blogged about the events in “Good Fortune: Grandfather Dies, Father Dies, Son Dies” partially as a way to process them. In February 2013, his father  started a blog to keep friends and extended family informed of what was happening with his son’s cancer.  John underwent aggressive chemotherapy which brought a remission that allowed him to finish his education and go through college graduation.

John Foster McKenna passed away on August 8, 2014 after a twenty month battle with brain cancer. John lived his life in San Jose, attending The Harker School, Bellarmine College Preparatory ’09, and Gonzaga University, Bachelors of Business Administration ’13. He is survived by his parents, John William McKenna and Melanie S McKenna, his grandparents John Eugene McKenna and Marilyn McKenna, and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins on both the East and West coasts.
John McKenna Obituary

Visitation and Funeral

If you knew John or are a friend of the family there will be visitation hours at Darling-Fischer Garden Chapel, 471 E. Santa Clara St, San Jose on Wednesday August 13th from 4-9pm, with a Rosary at 7 pm.  On Thursday, August 14th there will be a Mass of Christian Burial at St. Victor’s Catholic Church, 3108 Sierra Road, San Jose at 10 am.  A reception to continue the celebration of John’s life will be held afterwards.

“The present life of man upon earth, O king, seems to me, in comparison with that time which is unknown to us, like to the swift flight of a sparrow through the house wherein you sit at supper in winter, with your ealdormen and thegns, while the fire blazes in the midst, and the hall is warmed, but the wintry storms of rain or snow are raging abroad. The sparrow, flying in at one door and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry tempest; but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, passing from winter into winter again. So this life of man appears for a little while, but of what is to follow or what went before we know nothing at all.”
Venerable Bede’s “Ecclesiastical History of the English People (London: A Revised Translation With Introduction, Life, and Notes By A. M. Sellar, published by George Bell and Sons, 1907) Book 2, Chapter 13


I came across a quote by Thomas Carlyle that crystallized my sense of loss at John’s death.

“The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but what they miss.”
Thomas Carlyle

Remarks from Rosary Service

John W. McKenna has posted his remarks from the Rosary service here is a key passage but the entire eulogy is very moving and worth reading:

I have often remarked how amazed I have been at the manner with which he responded to his disease and its prognosis. That if it had been me, at the same age as John, there is exactly zero chance I would have responded with anything close to his equanimity. And I know that his ability to persevere is truly a credit to his mother.

In the days since his first seizure, when his friends were with him as they prepared to play football and had to respond to that sudden crisis, to the final night when one of his cousins and one of his friends were with him, Melanie and I have had the wonderful opportunity to see just how much love there was in John’s life. His friends, whether from Little League, our Berryessa neighborhood, Harker Academy, Bellarmine, or Gonzaga, and his family of beloved cousins, were constantly by his side; encouraging him, celebrating the good times, sharing stories or sometimes just being with him quietly. Their goodness and kindness showed us that he was truly blessed.

One thing that made the funeral very different was that about half of those in attendance were in their teens in twenties. It was a moving service and the first hour or so of the reception was also sombre, but then someone started to play some music and it took on more of the ambience of a wedding reception. I cannot imagine John Foster McKenna would have objected. We had all seen his death coming or so long we had all had the opportunity to grieve. John’s remarks end with a quote by Bill Clinton on April 19, 2005 at the ten year anniversary of the Oklahoma bombing that I found helpful:

“Yet, by the grace of God, time takes its toll not only on youth and beauty, but also on tragedy. The tomorrows come almost against our will. And they bring healing and hope, new responsibilities and new possibilities.”

 

Janet Iwasa: Animate Your Hypothesis to Explore Its Viability and Implications

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Design of Experiments

I found Janet Iwasa‘s Ted Talk on “how animations can help scientists test a hypothesis” to be extremely thought provoking.

Animation enables you to visualize process that are too small to be seen, even with sophisticated instruments, such as the biological phenomena that that Iwasa shares in the talk. But more importantly, it can  allow you to get a hypothesis out of your head in a way that it can be shared with others, reviewed and annotated.

As she observes near the end of her talk (excerpt from transcript of her talk)

Over the years, I found that animations aren’t just useful for communicating an idea, but they’re also really useful for exploring a hypothesis. Biologists for the most part are still using a paper and pencil to visualize the processes they study, and with the data we have now, that’s just not good enough anymore. The process of creating an animation can act as a catalyst that allows researchers to crystalize and refine their own ideas. One researcher I worked with who works on the molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases came up with experiments that were related directly to the animation that she and I worked on together, and in this way, animation can feed back into the research process.

Implications for Startups

I think we need to develop first diagrams and then modeling languages to allow us to visualize and animate some key aspects of the challenge startups face:

  • The product roadmap, especially modeling it as a collection of options to manage a set of potential and likely prospects. Discovery Kanban may provide some useful metaphors here.
  • The new product introduction problem: selection of a niche market and insertion and scale inside of a prospect’s firm.
  • The likely paths a negotiation may take, in particular how to sequence negotiations across players and within a firms’ buying cycle.
    In particular how to we model the different facets: you typically have one more contracts or agreements that are written as legal documents, a system diagram, a list of requirements, and a timeline for implementation/roll-out/proliferation to name just a few of the critical but often disjoint definitions of a deal.
  • The evolution of the incentives and outcomes from a business relationship over time. This would extend the timeline and overlay product or feature roadmaps with the customer’s perspective on the likely (or even a range of) requirements over time.
  • The evolution of a market structure over time: what will be the axes of competition and what will be standardized (and commoditized).

I think we will need to start with pencil and paper or a whiteboard sketch just as the biologists did. Roam’s “Back of the Napkin” certainly offers some very useful visual metaphors, as do decision tree models, tornado diagrams, and traditional spreadsheets to name just a few more. We are talking to several teams that are exploring different ways to combine numbers, words, and diagrams that are integrated into responsive models that can be explored (e.g. parameters changed, relationships varied).

Request for Information, Comment, and Proposals

If you are working on something that will allow a team to sketch and animate one or more critical aspects of a business we are interested in talking and exploring how to incorporate your capabilities into one or more of our offerings. In particular if it would enable hypotheses to be modeled and explored, and experiments defined to test or refine the hypotheses.

We will also be offering some on-line workshops, starting with key aspects of Discovery Kanban. If you would like to take part, in particular if you have real business issues that you are wrestling with that you are interested in seeing modeled in a small group setting, please contact us.

Q: How to Apply Lean Innovation Methods To Regulated Industries

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Demos, skmurphy

Q: My research focused on the assessment of atherosclerosis in coronary arteries using  Computed Tomography examinations as the imaging modality. I have looked at various aspects of atherosclerosis such as volume scores, automatic extraction of anatomical structures, plaque detection, dual energy CT and plaque distribution patterns. I am new to the lean innovation methods and am having difficulty applying methods like minimum viable product (MVP) in my industry, medical imaging,  which is heavily regulated. I cannot see how to do incremental updates given the level of regulatory signoff required.

We have worked with a number of medical instrument and “medical workflow” startups who face this challenge in different ways. And our work on the BeamWise team has led to a number of conversations with medical imaging and instrumentation companies developing new products.

Lean Innovation: Established Firms Vs. Startups

An established firm with existing customers should invest effort in instrumenting current offerings to get a better handle on actual use and duty cycle, and allow the technicians/researchers/doctors to provide feedback in context (at point of care or point of use) for shortcomings or issues. More simply, take a hard look at how folks are using your current product before proposing something new.

Startups need to separate the challenges of image collection from the usability. For new modalities of image collection you need to work with research groups to be able to get access to tissue samples or live subjects depending upon your application. Often a veterinary or agricultural application is an easier way in than aiming directly at human subject applications, once you have  established the usefulness finding teams that want to work with you on human subjects becomes easier. If your primary worry (or innovation) is more about usability or image presentation then you can work from “canned” image data sets and pay technicians, researchers, or doctors to take part in feedback sessions where they interact with the images produced (perhaps in the context of your user interface)  and give you feedback.

Net net, even though the final configuration is subject to rigorous review you can find ways to test different critical aspects of your product and iterate without having to get final approval.

Consider Attending Great Demo Workshop

You might also consider our October 15-16 “Great Demo” workshop, a number of medical imaging firms have attended over the years and have found that Peter Cohan offered a number of valuable insights they were able to incorporate into their discovery conversations and demos of new products.

You are also welcome to schedule a no cost office hours session if you want to talk further and have us help you design some experiments to move your MVP forward.

A Conversation With Tristan Kromer on B2B vs. B2C Customer Acquisition Challenges

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Audio, Customer Development, skmurphy


Direct download from http://traffic.libsyn.com/skmurphy/Tristan_Sean_6-13-14b.mp3

Here is a rough transcript of the first five minutes or so to give you a flavor, I think you will find it interesting if you are wrestling with customer development or customer validation in an early market:

Sean: I am sitting here today with Tristan Kromer, we are going to talk about the differences between B2B an B2C customer acquisition methods.

Tristan: some consumer startups seem to latch onto a particular technique and apply it regardless of context. I am really interested in the different approaches you can use to find B2B customers and where the differences are between selling to consumer, small business, and enterprise.

Sean: B2B the outreach is tailored / artisinal, where the price point or deal value is above 5-10,000. Consumer startups feel this pressure to move to more scalable methods much earlier due. I know one piece of advice you always offering regardless of whether it’s consumer or business is to have conversations with prospects on an ongoing basis.

Tristan: always start face to face, even for consumer. What the consumer folks may call a “manual process.” Because that’s a much more rapid form of connect. Even if you want to have a highly automated sales process, you believe that consumers will see your hero image and read your FAQ and click on the purchase button, that’s a sales process. Your face to face conversation can be roughly analogous: demonstrate the the value proposition, answer questions and then you have an ask. By doing that face to face, analog vs. digital so to speak, you get a lot more feedback and can see when the prospect smiles, frowns, looks confused, etc.. You can apply that feedback to your digital process. For example, when I use this language consistently  it’s getting a much better response. Let me try that on a landing page.

Sean: there is a desire to create scale, to create the digital process, right away. For me it’s much harder to learn from when you have a lot of unknowns. The odd thing is that B2B stays more personal because above a certain deal size you cannot assume you can avoid a negotiation to be able to get the business. There are going to be several serious conversations and at least one serious negotiating session where the value of the transaction is above $10,000.

Tristan: there is also a bias to a longer term relationship on the large dollar B2B purchase. There is an expectation of support that is often not there in a smaller consumer purchase. There is a sense of “you are going to be guy we deal with when we have problems or renew.”

Sean: yes the salesperson has to be viewed as a point of service and as providing value. Your point about a “bias ot a long term relationship” was a good one: I think the enduring consumer brands pay a lot of attention to that as well. With startup sometimes there is so much focus on the ramp that sometimes unfortunately less attention is paid to reputation, brand, social capitial, whatever you want to call it. It’s not so much “we have cool logo” but “our cool logo represents a promise that people can depend on.”

Tristan: I agree: it’s two different things. It’s esthetics vs. trust. You have repated interactions with the firm and now you can
trust them. I have recently been doing some work with large brands and it’s amazing the impact that a trusted brand has on conversations with customers. There is an automatic assumption that it’s going to be a serious conversation.

Sean: does that work against experimentation? Because they feel that they are carying the brand they don’t want to be “too experimental?”

Tristan: it opens doors and you can have conversations that startups find much more difficult to secure. So there can be a bias towards a false positive. But as least you are having conversations you can learn from instead of trying to have conversations. I think you can be aware of the bias and manage for it. But there is fear of failure, but you can compensate for that with “off brand” tests where you don’t identify the brand.

Sean: we don’t do as much “I am from IBM” as “Charlie recommended that we speak to you” and they can check with Charlie and he will confirm it. Or I am a member of this community, I have presented at this conference, I have taken part in this working group. There is a brand effect for smaller startups, but it’s predicated on prior accomplishments or prior
relationships that can be re-activated or leveraged.


Here are some other interesting interviews with Tristan:

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