2018 Renunciations

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Rules of Thumb, skmurphy

Peter Drucker has suggested that businesses organize their abandonment of business and practices that they never would have started doing if they knew when they start what they know now. This is my effort at 2018 renunciations for SKMurphy, Inc and in my personal life.

Daniel Kahneman’s Reasoned Rule Approach to Reducing Case Management Errors

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in checklist, Rules of Thumb, Sales, skmurphy

A reasoned rule approach is a good first step to managing decisions that fall into common patterns or cases. You identify six to eight variables that are distinct and obviously impact the outcome of the case and normalize them into standard scores that can then be added or averaged to create a summary score.

Questions to Answer Before You Start Negotiating

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in 2 Open for Business Stage, 3 Early Customer Stage, Rules of Thumb, Sales, skmurphy

Here  are some questions to ask yourself before you start negotiating a complex business relationship: for example a software license, SaaS subscription, or a reseller or OEM relationship. Entire books are written on negotiation, I am trying to highlight some questions that can get overlooked.

13 Tips For Getting Up Early and Arriving Early

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Rules of Thumb, skmurphy

I like getting up early and arriving early. But I find the hours late at night can unlock a lot of creativity so I often get up late unless I schedule something early. I also like working up to the last possible moment–what is it about the last few minutes before you have to leave that are so productive–that I arrive late. Starting from myself as someone with good intentions but poor follow through here are some observations and suggestions for getting up early and arriving early. 

Working in Silence

Written by Sean Murphy. Posted in Rules of Thumb, skmurphy

I can be very productive with a certain amount of background noise, I find it easier to write if there is music playing or I am in a moderately noisy coffee house where there are many low conversations going on in the background. But when I really need to think hard about something–typically a problem or a challenge I am facing–and give it all of my concentration and focus, then working in silence is best. 

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